Garden Store Fairy Gardens!

Now that it’s officially spring and my daffodils, pansies and lantana are popping up throughout my garden, I’m more than eager to pull on my gloves and hit the dirt. That also means I’m ready to skip over to the garden store – my home away from home.

On my most recent trip, I noticed tons of fairy gardens tucked into corners here and there. They made me so happy, I took pictures and wanted to share them with you. >>

Things to notice: A piece of driftwood as the “house”, the miniature twig furniture and door (which were for sale inside the garden shop), broken pieces of slate as a walkway, and a blue marble used as a gazing ball. I also love the purple shamrocks on the right.

Things to notice: The low basket this is planted in – and that darling house! I don’t know where they got this, but I love the roof and rounded door. The miniature furniture and watering can were for sale in the store. Also notice the use of a pine cone – like a little tree. Speaking of trees…look at the beautiful Goshiki False Holly on the back right. I never would have thought to put one of those in a fairy garden! The monkey grass on the front is also a cool choice.

Things to notice: Again with the fabulous house, and look at the sweet bench out front with a butterfly wing-shaped back. Love the choice of plants here, too. Great color with what I think is a type of Persian Shield. The Dwarf Umbrella on the back right adds wonderful height.

Things to notice: Yes, the house. This reminds me of a shaker-style home with a double chimney. What fairy wouldn’t love to live here? There’s more darling furniture, too. Notice the mini stone pillars at the entrance to the slate walkway. And the mushrooms on either side of the house add a pop of color. Oh, and we can’t forget the little succulents next to the front door – planted in mini urns, of course. The bushes in the front are juniper! Wouldn’t a juniper bonsai be incredibly cool in a fairy garden?

Things to notice: The mini garden gnomes. (Do you see the one hiding in the back with a red cap?) I also love the white picket fence with a stone entrance into the garden of ferns and other multi-colored plants. The painted red pot that holds it all together is a cute touch, too.

Things to notice: This comes with its own fairy…and her bike. Love the slice of wood that makes a platform for the bike. This one also used the picket fencing and stone entrance. I like the assortment of plants a little better here. Lots of texture and some varied color = very pretty.

Things to notice: Um, the PLAYGROUND. It’s complete with a swing set, slide and park benches. And look at the flag bunting that surrounds the mini park. I can’t even. Too cute!!

Things to notice: While this isn’t a fairy garden per se, I love the mix of ferns and the little stone bird tucked inside of this basket – that looks more like a nest. You could very easily add some fairy furniture and invite them to move in under the foliage.

That concludes our little tour. I hope you enjoyed it. If you haven’t quite had enough, here are more pictures to explore. I created an entire board on Pinterest just for fairy gardens. #cantstopwontstop

Have a great day, and I’ll be back on Friday with a few ideas for Easter. Hip, hop, hooray!

Blessings,

Kate

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A Front Yard Fairy Garden

My girls have been wanting to create a mini fairy garden for quite some time. We finally pulled it all together this week, so I thought it would be fun to share.

Here’s the garden – for now! We keep wanting to add things as we go.

fairy garden

Let’s take you back to the start.

After looking through pin after pin of adorable and quite elaborate fairy gardens, we decided to keep it simple and go with a large saucer as our base. We filled it with potting soil so it was ready to plant and decorate!

saucer with supplies

Below is a birds-eye view so you can see a few of the plants and fairy treats we planned to use.

top view of supplies

A plant tip

Think small in terms of your plants. Don’t use things that will grow too tall – like herbs. As much as I wanted to fill this thing with flowering thyme, I knew it would take over in just a few short weeks. For one, I used succulents, which are great for this kind of thing.

succulents

We’ll get to that fairy hut in a moment. Let’s keep talking about plants for just a quick sec.

In the next picture, you can see I also chose Creeping Jenny, which is a darling ground cover with tiny leaves. The girls and I think the fairies like to hide in these trailing vines.

Creeping Jenny will do just what it says – creep along the ground. But it’s easy to cut back or even divide and replant somewhere else in the garden, if needed.

creepy jenny

A few things you’ve probably noticed are the “flying” ladybugs and wood chip stepping stones. Those all came from Hobby Lobby! They have a small section of miniature garden supplies under the brand of My Garden Friends. <3

Some cute things you’ll find from My Garden Friends.

red mushrooms ladybug picks wooden chairs

I actually bought our mini trellis and furniture from a garden store many years ago. They were stashed away with my gardening tools. I was a happy camper to uncover them for our project.

fairies

Now, our fairies were from Hobby Lobby. That was something we didn’t already have, and is a must-have item. Right?

Something to keep in mind if you have birthday parties coming up: these make awesome presents.

You could package up a fairy garden kit as a gift!

Our kids gave a package of fairies to our Mimi for Mother’s Day. As many of you know, she’s a master gardener. We thought this was a perfect gift and addition to her lovely garden. I’ll take a picture of where her fairies landed when I visit next!!

Now, are you ready for the fairy hut?! The secret supply, IMO, is this moss-on-a-roll. It’s genius.

supplies for fairy hut

It is incredibly easy to unroll and hot-glue to any surface. It has a mesh backing that holds the moss together.

All I did was buy an inexpensive plastic plant liner and glued strips of moss to the outer edge. We also cut an opening so the fairies could easily crawl inside for a cozy rest.

more supplies for fairy hut

That’s pretty much the grand tour of our mini garden. Here’s another angle of the finished project so you can see all of the pieces in place.

top view

And here’s what it looks like tucked in our front garden.

in the garden

Big note here…the reason it’s in the front is because Puppy Leo has suddenly decided he wants to dig holes to China in our backyard AND eat anything he sees that’s new or interesting in the garden.

I wasn’t about to risk putting the girls’ project back there and have it torn apart or eaten. So, in the front yard it went. Now all of our friends and neighbors can enjoy it, too. That’s a plus.

We’re off to watch our garden grow and fairies fly.

Have a sunny, fun day.

Kate

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DIY Moss Planters

Okay, so earlier in the week I shared a few easy Easter flower arrangements. One of the pictures showed a darling moss-covered planter.

moss pot

I researched how to do this and found a variety of methods. Most of the DIYs involved a concoction of buttermilk and live moss mixed in a blender and then painted on the side of a terra cotta pot. While I appreciate this natural approach, it sounded kind of gross thinking about a dairy-based anything growing on the middle of my table. I mean, would it begin to smell? I have a super sensitive sniffer. It’s borderline bionic. I can’t do weird smells or anything close to rancid or my gag reflex kicks in. Needless to say, I opted for the easy and safe/non-smelly route.

All it required was a few items:

Moss planter supplies

L to R: Raffia, terra cotta pot, moss ribbon, glue gun

The key was this moss ribbon I found at Hob Lob. It was super easy to work with, and it wrapped around the pot very nicely in strips.

Moss ribbon

Moss ribbon is thin and the back is lined with mesh that makes it easy to hot glue to any surface.

My pot was taller than the moss, so I hot-glued two strips of moss ribbon around the pot and trimmed the excess along the bottom with scissors.

Moss pot

This was my first strip of ribbon.

Tip: Wear garden gloves when you work with the glue gun so you don’t burn your fingers when you pat down the moss. Hot glue hurts like the dickens.

Once you’ve trimmed the edges of the moss, you can wrap a few pieces of raffia around the pot to cover where the two pieces of ribbon came together.

Finished moss pot

My moss pot is finished, filled with soil and ready for some flowers already!

I chose pansies for this pot. I plan to make another one and give these as Easter gifts to my mom and SIL tomorrow. Shh! They’ll be a surprise.

Finished moss planter

Ta-da! It is ready to give as a surprise little gift.

I hope you found this easy to follow – and much easier than the buttermilk madness. Let me know what you think. Have a super Saturday and check back tomorrow for a special Easter message.

-Kate

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